Detection and Management of Preeclampsia: Current Laboratory Testing and Emerging Biomarkers (Online CE Course)

(based on 493 customer ratings)

Author: David J. Moffa, PhD
Reviewer: Jenny Camele, MT(ASCP)

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Continuing Education Credits

P.A.C.E.® Contact Hours (acceptable for AMT, ASCP, and state recertification): 2 hour(s)
Course number 578-024-16, approved through 4/30/2018
Florida Board of Clinical Laboratory Personnel Credit Hours - General (Clinical Chemistry/UA/Toxicology): 2 hour(s)
Course number 20-547659, approved through 9/1/2018


  • Define preeclampsia (PE)and discuss its prevalence, characteristics, signs, and symptoms.
  • Identify the characteristics of mild and severe PE as well as the relationship to the HELLP Syndrome.
  • Define the risk factors for PE and differentiate between eclampsia and the HELLP Syndrome.
  • Describe the pathophysiology of PE, its cause, treatment, and prevention.
  • Describe the main triggers used to diagnose PE.
  • Identify laboratory tests used to assist in the diagnosis of PE.
  • Define and describe angiogenesis relative to its possible role in PE and associated pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors.
  • Describe the various potential biomarkers for identifying pregnant women at risk for PE.
  • Identify assay methods available for several potential biomarkers.

Customer Ratings

(based on 493 customer ratings)

Course Outline

Click on the links below to preview selected pages from this course.
  • Background and Overview of Preeclampsia
      • Background and Overview
      • Which of the following statements is NOT true in describing preeclampsia (PE)?
      • True or False. PE affects 5-10% of pregnant women and typically occurs after 20 weeks' gestation.
  • Classification and Characteristics of Preeclampsia
      • Classification and Characteristics of Preeclampsia (PE)
      • HELLP Syndrome
      • Which of the following can be defined as the presence of hypertension (blood pressure >= 140/90) on two occasions at least six hours apart?
      • What condition NOT attributable to any other disorder is associated with eclampsia?
      • Which statement is TRUE regarding the HELLP syndrome?
  • Risk Factors for Preeclampsia
  • Pathophysiology of Preeclampsia
      • Pathophysiology of Preeclampsia (PE)
      • Doppler Ultrasonography of Uterine Arteries
      • The pathophysiology of PE may be attributable to endothelial cell dysfunction in the ________________.
  • Treatment and Prevention
      • Treatment and Managment of Preeclampsia (PE)
      • Treatment and Management of PE, continued
      • Postpartum PE
      • True or false? The only cure for PE is delivery of the baby.
  • Current Laboratory Testing Used for PE Workup
  • Emerging Biomarkers for Preeclampsia
      • Emerging Biomarkers to Identify Risk for Preeclampsia (PE)
      • Angiogenesis and Angiogenic Biomarkers
      • Table I: Circulating Levels of Angiogenic Biomarkers in Preeclampsia (PE)
      • Table II: Circulating Levels of Other Potential Biomarkers in Preeclampsia (PE).
      • Laboratory Methods for Quantitation of Biomarkers Used for Determining Risk of PE
      • Angiogenesis is the physiological process through which new blood vessels form from pre-existing vessels.
      • What statements are TRUE concerning angiogenesis and angiogenic biomarkers?
      • PIGF acts as a vasodilator increasing the diameter of existing arteries, and its serum levels have been found to be significantly lower in mild and se...
      • Choose the correct answer regards the circulating levels of sFlt-1, sEng, and the sFlt-1/PIGF ratio in pregnant women with preeclampsia (PE).
      • Which potential preeclampsia (PE) biomarker that is decreased in PE can be described as a glycoprotein, which is derived from the trophoblast cells an...
      • Which potential PE biomarker is a cell surface molecule expressed by platelets and endothelial cells and circulating levels are increased in PE?
  • Summary and Conclusions
  • References
      • References

Additional Information

Level of instruction: Intermediate

Intended Audience: Medical laboratory scientists, medical technologists, and technicians. This course is also appropriate for medical laboratory science students and pathology residents.

Author information: David Moffa, PhD, has over 30 years of experience in the health care industry as an executive manager, clinical laboratory director, and medical laboratory scientist. He is currently a technical consultant for Kentmere Healthcare, Wilmington, DE, and until his retirement, was the Regional Director for LabCorp, Inc. He holds a PhD in medical biochemistry from the School of Medicine, West Virginia University.

Reviewer information: Prior to her retirement in 2012, Jenny Camele was employed by Laboratory Corporation of America as the manager of customer service operations for the Fairmont West Virginia Region and a Quality Assurance committee member. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology from West Virginia University.

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