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Immunosuppression

The activation of a T cell after transplantation results in its proliferation and division through to the S phase of mitosis.
Several drugs have been developed to stop the activation, proliferation and eventual division of the T cell, as illustrated to the right.
ALG and OKT3 are two drugs that inhibit the T cell very early on.
Cyclosporine A and FK506 inhibit the T cell from going into late activation.
Sirolimus and dacluzimab inhibit the cells from going into DNA synthesis.
Azathioprine, MMF (Mycophenolate Mofetil) and prednisone stop the eventual mitosis.