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The page below is a sample from the LabCE course Diabetes: Diagnosis, Laboratory Testing, and the Current American Diabetes Association Guidelines (2018). Access the complete course and earn ASCLS P.A.C.E.-approved continuing education credits by subscribing online.

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Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM)

The updated ADA guidelines contain discussions on using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes starting at age 18. CGM devices use subcutaneous glucose sensors to automatically track blood glucose levels 24 hours a day. Most devices have alarms for hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic alerts. These systems alert users to changes in blood glucose levels which can assist them in making informed decisions about nutrition, physical activity, and medication. Although the technology has been available for more than 15 years, the number of individuals currently using the devices is low, in part, due to cost, measurement reliability, user problems, and lack of standardization. A few of these CGM devices have been approved by the FDA.
The ADA describes the "flash" CGM devices which differ from other CGM devices because they do not have alarms, do not require calibration and do not communicate continuously but only on demand. They also tend to have lower costs. The ADA indicates that more discussions are needed on outcomes and specific recommendations for these "flash" CGM devices.